BLACKHORSE LOWE
filmmaker
BLACKHORSE LOWE
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cinephiliabeyond:

Directed by Christian Weisenborn and Erwin Keusch, I Am My Films: A Portrait of Werner Herzog (1978) explores the life and work of contemporary filmmaker. The documentary features extensive interviews with Herzog as he discusses his impoverished childhood and his obsession with filmmaking, which bloomed early. The interview footage is interspersed with clips from some of the director’s many films from the 1960s and 1970s, including some from his first feature film, and his first major commercial and critical success, Signs of Life, which he made using a stolen camera.

Herzog shared his wisdom and experience with a rapt audience at last year’s Locarno Film Festival. Among the many pieces of advice were the following, compiled by Indiewire. See their post for more essential highlights from this fascinating session. —Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School: Apply & Learn the Art of Guerilla Filmmaking & Lock-Picking
It’s a very dangerous thing to have a video village, a video output. Avoid it. Shut it down. Throw it into the next river. You have an actor, and people that close all staring at the monitor gives a false feeling; that ‘feel good’ feeling of security. It’s always misleading. You have to avoid it.
I always do the slate board; I want to be the last one from the actors on one side and the technical apparatus on the other side. I’m the last one and then things roll. You don’t have to be a dictator.
Never show anyone in a documentary, rushes. They’ll become self-conscious. Never ever do that.
Sometimes it’s good to leave your character alone so no one can predict what is going to happen next. Sometimes these moments are very telling and moving.
Dismiss the culture of complaint you hear everywhere.
You should always try to find a way deep into someone.

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theallelectrickitchen:

"Resilient Wavelengths" 2014. Screen print on bristol paper. 11" x 14" First attempt at screen printing. The first 11 prints are available for purchase. $20 each. Each print varies from one another. For more information contact me either on my page or at theallelectrickitchen@hotmail.com PayPal: theallelectrickitchen@hotmail.com
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HOLLY HUNT at the Jam Spot - Albuquerque, NM
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david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
david lynch
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cinephiliabeyond:

Cinéma, de notre temps: A Portrait of Hou Hsiao-Hsien  (1999). Olivier Assayas’ documentary on the acclaimed filmmaker of the masterpiece Flowers of Shanghai, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, who is considered by many to be the greatest Taiwanese filmmaker of all time. Six of his films to date have been nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, though the prize has so far eluded him. Hou was voted “Director of the Decade” for the 1990s in a poll of American and international critics put together by The Village Voice and Film Comment. Despite such acclaim, his work remains rarely distributed in the West outside of the film festival circuit.
Originally aired as part of Cinéma de notre temps, HHH: Un portrait de Hou Hsiao-Hsien (HHH: A Portrait of Hou Hsiao-Hsien) gave French director and screenwriter Olivier Assayas the opportunity to turn the lens on his primary artistic influence. Assayas, who while a critic at Cahiers du cinéma had championed Hou long before it was in vogue to do so, followed the master filmmaker around his native Taiwan. Released just after Assayas’ breakout Irma Vep, this intimate documentary profiles a director who was largely unknown on the global scene in the late 90s. HHH: A Portrait of Hou Hsiao-Hsien remains the most thorough look at one of the most revered living directors. —Ullens Center for Contemporary Art

The Museum of the Moving Image presents a retrospective of Hou’s films, Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien (September 12–October 12). The full schedule will be announced soon. Thanks to Tomoko Kawamoto for the tip.
Hou Hsiao-hsien, the leading figure of the Taiwanese New Wave, is one of the most important and influential filmmakers to emerge over the past three decades. His sensuous, richly textured work, marked by elegantly staged long takes, largely static camera positions, and a radically elliptical approach to storytelling, is instantly recognizable in such widely acclaimed movies as Flowers of Shanghai, The Puppetmaster, Café Lumière, A City of Sadness, Dust in the Wind, and Flight of the Red Balloon. The retrospective Also Like Life: The Films of Hou Hsiao-hsien includes all of Hou’s seventeen feature films as director, all shown on film (including new 35mm prints). The series will also include short films directed by Hou Hsiao-hsien, and a sidebar program of related films including Olivier Assayas’s intimate documentary HHH: A Portrait of Hou Hsiao-hsien, Edward Yang’s seminal Taipei Story (starring, and co-written by, Hou), and more.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

In 1993, Sam Fuller takes Jim Jarmusch on a trip into Brazil’s Mato Grosso, up the River Araguaia to the village of Santa Isabel Do Morro, where 40 years before, Darryl F. Zanuck had sent Fuller to scout a location and write a script for a film called Tigrero, which was to star John Wayne, but ultimately the picture was scrapped due to the insurance costs being too high. Fuller, frustrated with the bullshit involved with getting the picture off the ground with the studio, threw himself into his work on the screenplay for Run of the Arrow.
Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994)

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The film begins as a chronological diary of the trip, with Fuller and Jarmusch (sporting a Ramones T-shirt through most of the filming) boarding a small cargo plane and arriving among the Karajá. Fuller had shot approximately sixteen minutes of 16mm Cinemascope footage back in 1954, depicting the indigenous people and the landscapes who would become a vital part of a sprawling Fox action film starring John Wayne, Ava Gardner and Tyrone Power. Due to insurance issues, the production never came to fruition. The natives are shown the existing scenes (which later wound up visually squished as a surreal passage in Fuller’s Shock Corridor) and are moved by the images of themselves and their kin preserved on film. The subtle technological changes in the culture are the only major marks of the passage of time, and the two directors ruminate on what could have been if the film had been produced and released. 
Every bit as engaging as his reputation might suggest, the cigar-chomping Fuller makes an enjoyable guide as he simultaneously discusses the abandoned Tigrero project. (The title, Tiger, refers to the hero of the film.) Most interesting is his opening monologue discussing his proposed opening for the film, in which a tracking shot along the Amazon would capture the predatory behavior of various animals. The pacing of the film is fairly langorous, soaking in the atmosphere as two like-minded Americans bounce off each other as they learn more about a culture as far removed from the American filmmaking scene as possible. —mondo-digital via frame-paradiso

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

In 1993, Sam Fuller takes Jim Jarmusch on a trip into Brazil’s Mato Grosso, up the River Araguaia to the village of Santa Isabel Do Morro, where 40 years before, Darryl F. Zanuck had sent Fuller to scout a location and write a script for a film called Tigrero, which was to star John Wayne, but ultimately the picture was scrapped due to the insurance costs being too high. Fuller, frustrated with the bullshit involved with getting the picture off the ground with the studio, threw himself into his work on the screenplay for Run of the Arrow.
Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994)

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The film begins as a chronological diary of the trip, with Fuller and Jarmusch (sporting a Ramones T-shirt through most of the filming) boarding a small cargo plane and arriving among the Karajá. Fuller had shot approximately sixteen minutes of 16mm Cinemascope footage back in 1954, depicting the indigenous people and the landscapes who would become a vital part of a sprawling Fox action film starring John Wayne, Ava Gardner and Tyrone Power. Due to insurance issues, the production never came to fruition. The natives are shown the existing scenes (which later wound up visually squished as a surreal passage in Fuller’s Shock Corridor) and are moved by the images of themselves and their kin preserved on film. The subtle technological changes in the culture are the only major marks of the passage of time, and the two directors ruminate on what could have been if the film had been produced and released. 
Every bit as engaging as his reputation might suggest, the cigar-chomping Fuller makes an enjoyable guide as he simultaneously discusses the abandoned Tigrero project. (The title, Tiger, refers to the hero of the film.) Most interesting is his opening monologue discussing his proposed opening for the film, in which a tracking shot along the Amazon would capture the predatory behavior of various animals. The pacing of the film is fairly langorous, soaking in the atmosphere as two like-minded Americans bounce off each other as they learn more about a culture as far removed from the American filmmaking scene as possible. —mondo-digital via frame-paradiso

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

In 1993, Sam Fuller takes Jim Jarmusch on a trip into Brazil’s Mato Grosso, up the River Araguaia to the village of Santa Isabel Do Morro, where 40 years before, Darryl F. Zanuck had sent Fuller to scout a location and write a script for a film called Tigrero, which was to star John Wayne, but ultimately the picture was scrapped due to the insurance costs being too high. Fuller, frustrated with the bullshit involved with getting the picture off the ground with the studio, threw himself into his work on the screenplay for Run of the Arrow.
Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994)

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The film begins as a chronological diary of the trip, with Fuller and Jarmusch (sporting a Ramones T-shirt through most of the filming) boarding a small cargo plane and arriving among the Karajá. Fuller had shot approximately sixteen minutes of 16mm Cinemascope footage back in 1954, depicting the indigenous people and the landscapes who would become a vital part of a sprawling Fox action film starring John Wayne, Ava Gardner and Tyrone Power. Due to insurance issues, the production never came to fruition. The natives are shown the existing scenes (which later wound up visually squished as a surreal passage in Fuller’s Shock Corridor) and are moved by the images of themselves and their kin preserved on film. The subtle technological changes in the culture are the only major marks of the passage of time, and the two directors ruminate on what could have been if the film had been produced and released. 
Every bit as engaging as his reputation might suggest, the cigar-chomping Fuller makes an enjoyable guide as he simultaneously discusses the abandoned Tigrero project. (The title, Tiger, refers to the hero of the film.) Most interesting is his opening monologue discussing his proposed opening for the film, in which a tracking shot along the Amazon would capture the predatory behavior of various animals. The pacing of the film is fairly langorous, soaking in the atmosphere as two like-minded Americans bounce off each other as they learn more about a culture as far removed from the American filmmaking scene as possible. —mondo-digital via frame-paradiso

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

In 1993, Sam Fuller takes Jim Jarmusch on a trip into Brazil’s Mato Grosso, up the River Araguaia to the village of Santa Isabel Do Morro, where 40 years before, Darryl F. Zanuck had sent Fuller to scout a location and write a script for a film called Tigrero, which was to star John Wayne, but ultimately the picture was scrapped due to the insurance costs being too high. Fuller, frustrated with the bullshit involved with getting the picture off the ground with the studio, threw himself into his work on the screenplay for Run of the Arrow.
Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994)

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The film begins as a chronological diary of the trip, with Fuller and Jarmusch (sporting a Ramones T-shirt through most of the filming) boarding a small cargo plane and arriving among the Karajá. Fuller had shot approximately sixteen minutes of 16mm Cinemascope footage back in 1954, depicting the indigenous people and the landscapes who would become a vital part of a sprawling Fox action film starring John Wayne, Ava Gardner and Tyrone Power. Due to insurance issues, the production never came to fruition. The natives are shown the existing scenes (which later wound up visually squished as a surreal passage in Fuller’s Shock Corridor) and are moved by the images of themselves and their kin preserved on film. The subtle technological changes in the culture are the only major marks of the passage of time, and the two directors ruminate on what could have been if the film had been produced and released. 
Every bit as engaging as his reputation might suggest, the cigar-chomping Fuller makes an enjoyable guide as he simultaneously discusses the abandoned Tigrero project. (The title, Tiger, refers to the hero of the film.) Most interesting is his opening monologue discussing his proposed opening for the film, in which a tracking shot along the Amazon would capture the predatory behavior of various animals. The pacing of the film is fairly langorous, soaking in the atmosphere as two like-minded Americans bounce off each other as they learn more about a culture as far removed from the American filmmaking scene as possible. —mondo-digital via frame-paradiso

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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cinephiliabeyond:

In 1993, Sam Fuller takes Jim Jarmusch on a trip into Brazil’s Mato Grosso, up the River Araguaia to the village of Santa Isabel Do Morro, where 40 years before, Darryl F. Zanuck had sent Fuller to scout a location and write a script for a film called Tigrero, which was to star John Wayne, but ultimately the picture was scrapped due to the insurance costs being too high. Fuller, frustrated with the bullshit involved with getting the picture off the ground with the studio, threw himself into his work on the screenplay for Run of the Arrow.
Tigrero: A Film That Was Never Made (1994)

// 
The film begins as a chronological diary of the trip, with Fuller and Jarmusch (sporting a Ramones T-shirt through most of the filming) boarding a small cargo plane and arriving among the Karajá. Fuller had shot approximately sixteen minutes of 16mm Cinemascope footage back in 1954, depicting the indigenous people and the landscapes who would become a vital part of a sprawling Fox action film starring John Wayne, Ava Gardner and Tyrone Power. Due to insurance issues, the production never came to fruition. The natives are shown the existing scenes (which later wound up visually squished as a surreal passage in Fuller’s Shock Corridor) and are moved by the images of themselves and their kin preserved on film. The subtle technological changes in the culture are the only major marks of the passage of time, and the two directors ruminate on what could have been if the film had been produced and released. 
Every bit as engaging as his reputation might suggest, the cigar-chomping Fuller makes an enjoyable guide as he simultaneously discusses the abandoned Tigrero project. (The title, Tiger, refers to the hero of the film.) Most interesting is his opening monologue discussing his proposed opening for the film, in which a tracking shot along the Amazon would capture the predatory behavior of various animals. The pacing of the film is fairly langorous, soaking in the atmosphere as two like-minded Americans bounce off each other as they learn more about a culture as far removed from the American filmmaking scene as possible. —mondo-digital via frame-paradiso

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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Ai Weiwei's Unexpected Navajo Art Collaboration
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